History Uncovered

Find the answers to your questions about history, read in depth analysis of historical events from our experts and discover the stories of English Heritage sites around the country.

Dragons and their Origins

Smaug © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer - New Line Cinema - WingNut Films | The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug, 2013
Posted:
15 March 2019
Posted By:
Carolyne Larrington
Categories:
History Uncovered

Where did the dragon myth originate, and why are dragon stories so widespread across at least two continents? Carolyne Larrington, Professor of medieval European literature at the University of Oxford, investigates. Dragons feature in legend and folklore all across Britain, as well as Europe...

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Where Do Myths, Legends and Folktales Come From?

Posted:
15 March 2019
Posted By:
Carolyne Larrington
Categories:
History Uncovered

Myths, legends and folktales are well established in the fabric of English culture. But where do these often fantastical stories come from? Carolyne Larrington, Professor of medieval European literature at the University of Oxford, examines the origins of these stories, from dragons, kelpies and hob...

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Stonehenge in the 21st century: the story so far

The 2013 Stonehenge visitor centre
Posted:
29 January 2019
Posted By:
Amanda Chadburn
Categories:
History Uncovered

The early 21st century was an immensely exciting period of archaeological discovery within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. These years also saw the long-awaited opening of a new visitor centre. In the last of our blogs charting 100 years of care since Stonehenge came into public ownership, Am...

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Stonehenge 1986–97: a World Heritage Site

Aerial view of Stonehenge in 1985
Posted:
22 January 2019
Posted By:
Julian Richards
Categories:
History Uncovered

In this blog post, part of our series charting 100 years of care and conservation of Stonehenge since 1918, archaeologist Julian Richards looks at the decade from 1986. It was a time that saw Stonehenge, together with Avebury, become a World Heritage Site, in recognition not only of the outstanding ...

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1816: The year the sun nearly died

Giant sunspots on the surface of the Sun. ©NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams
Posted:
20 December 2018
Posted By:
Dr Harry Cliff
Categories:
History Uncovered

To celebrate this year’s winter solstice, we’ve teamed up with the Science Museum to explore the ways that humans have made sense of the sun throughout history. You can learn more about the sun, by visiting the Science Museum’s latest blockbuster exhibition, The Sun: Living With Our Star. ...

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